NVMe on Linux

NVMe on Linux

NVMe stands for “non-volatile memory express” and is a host controller interface and storage protocol that was created to accelerate the transfer of data between enterprise and client systems and solid-state drives (SSD). It works over a computer’s high-speed Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe) bus. What I see when I look at this string of letters, however, is “envy me.” And the reason for the envy is significant.

Using NVMe, data transfer happens much faster than it does with rotating drives. In fact, NVMe drives can move data seven times faster than SATA SSDs. That’s seven times faster than the SSDs that many of us are using today. This means that your systems could boot blindingly fast when an NVMe drive is serving as its boot drive. In fact, these days anyone buying a new system should probably not consider one that doesn’t come with NVMe built-in — whether a server or a PC.

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